fachadas

Ángel González García. Cuatro lecciones sobre Mark Rothko (II)(II) “A propósito de Mark Rothko (II)” 19/11/1987

¿Y es Nueva York la ciudad más hermosa del mundo?
No dista mucho de serlo. No hay noches urbanas como las suyas. He contemplado a la ciudad desde la altura de ciertas ventanas. Es cuando los grandes edificios pierden realidad y asumen sus poderes mágicos. Son incorpóreos, es decir que uno no ve sino las ventanas encendidas.
Cuadrado en llamas tras cuadrado en llamas, engastados en el éter. Aquí hay poesía, pues hemos hecho descender a las estrellas (…)

Patria Mía. Ezra Pound (1885 – 1972)

 

Mark Rothko, Underground Fantasy, c. 1940, oil on canvas, Gift of The Mark Rothko Foundation, Inc., 1986.43.130

 

Sandra Lousada. Rothko Exhibition 1961 at The Whitechapel Gallery London.

 

Entrance to Subway (Subway Station / Subway Scene)1938 by Mark Rothko

 

Mark Rothko – Entrance to a Subway (1938)

 

Rothko Exhibition 1961 at The Whitechapel Gallery London. Sandra Lousada became a photographer in the late 1950s.

 

Rothko Exhibition 1961 – Sandra Lousada
Rothko Exhibition 1961 – Sandra Lousada
Rothko Exhibition 1961 – Sandra Lousada

 

Mark Rothko at Whitechapel Gallery, 1961; photo: Sandra Lousada

 

Mark Rothko Untitled [Woman in Subway], 1936
Mark Rothko (1903-1970), Subway, 1935, c/o Pictoright Amsterdam 2011. Oil on canvas, 24 x 18 in. Collection Kate Rothko Prizel.

 

Installation view of Mark Rothko, Portland Art Museum

 

Mark Rothko. 1964.

 

“I also hang the pictures low rather than high, and particularly in the case of the largest ones, often as close to the floor as is feasible, for that is the way they are painted.”

Mark Rothko

Instadialectics

Photo by @codycobb

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British Cops Want to Use AI to Spot Porn—But It Keeps Mistaking Desert Pics for Nudes

“Sometimes it comes up with a desert and it thinks its an indecent image or pornography,” Mark Stokes, the department’s head of digital and electronics forensics, recently told The Telegraph. “For some reason, lots of people have screen-savers of deserts and it picks it up thinking it is skin colour.”

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“El algoritmo de la policía londinense no distingue un desierto de un desnudo.” (…) “Cuando el programa debía señalar o “flaggear” a personas desnudas fallaba y por mucho, demostrando poseer una mirada especialmente pecaminosa.” (…) “Confundía imágenes del desierto y sinuosas dunas de arena con piel humana, con cuerpos desnudos.”

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-Send dunes.

Words

Transcript:

Words, English words, are full of echoes, of memories, of associations. They have been out and about, on people’s lips, in their houses, in the streets, in the fields, for so many centuries. And that is one of the chief difficulties in writing them today – that they are stored with other meanings, with other memories, and they have contracted so many famous marriages in the past. The splendid word “incarnadine,” for example – who can use that without remembering “multitudinous seas”? In the old days, of course, when English was a new language, writers could invent new words and use them. Nowadays it is easy enough to invent new words – they spring to the lips whenever we see a new sight or feel a new sensation – but we cannot use them because the English language is old. You cannot use a brand new word in an old language because of the very obvious yet always mysterious fact that a word is not a single and separate entity, but part of other words. Indeed it is not a word until it is part of a sentence. Words belong to each other, although, of course, only a great poet knows that the word “incarnadine” belongs to “multitudinous seas.” To combine new words with old words is fatal to the constitution of the sentence. In order to use new words properly you would have to invent a whole new language; and that, though no doubt we shall come to it, is not at the moment our business. Our business is to see what we can do with the old English language as it is. How can we combine the old words in new orders so that they survive, so that they create beauty, so that they tell the truth? That is the question.

And the person who could answer that question would deserve whatever crown of glory the world has to offer. Think what it would mean if you could teach, or if you could learn the art of writing. Why, every book, every newspaper you’d pick up, would tell the truth, or create beauty. But there is, it would appear, some obstacle in the way, some hindrance to the teaching of words. For though at this moment at least a hundred professors are lecturing on the literature of the past, at least a thousand critics are reviewing the literature of the present, and hundreds upon hundreds of young men and women are passing examinations in English literature with the utmost credit, still – do we write better, do we read better than we read and wrote four hundred years ago when we were un-lectured, un-criticized, untaught? Is our modern Georgian literature a patch on the Elizabethan? Well, where then are we to lay the blame? Not on our professors; not on our reviewers; not on our writers; but on words. It is words that are to blame. They are the wildest, freest, most irresponsible, most un-teachable of all things. Of course, you can catch them and sort them and place them in alphabetical order in dictionaries. But words do not live in dictionaries; they live in the mind. If you want proof of this, consider how often in moments of emotion when we most need words we find none. Yet there is the dictionary; there at our disposal are some half-a-million words all in alphabetical order. But can we use them? No, because words do not live in dictionaries, they live in the mind. Look once more at the dictionary. There beyond a doubt lie plays more splendid than Antony and Cleopatra; poems lovelier than the Ode to a Nightingale; novels beside which Pride and Prejudice or David Copperfield are the crude bunglings of amateurs. It is only a question of finding the right words and putting them in the right order. But we cannot do it because they do not live in dictionaries; they live in the mind. And how do they live in the mind? Variously and strangely, much as human beings live, ranging hither and thither, falling in love, and mating together. It is true that they are much less bound by ceremony and convention than we are. Royal words mate with commoners. English words marry French words, German words, Indian words, Negro words, if they have a fancy. Indeed, the less we enquire into the past of our dear Mother English the better it will be for that lady’s reputation. For she has gone a-roving, a-roving fair maid.

Thus to lay down any laws for such irreclaimable vagabonds is worse than useless. A few trifling rules of grammar and spelling is all the constraint we can put on them. All we can say about them, as we peer at them over the edge of that deep, dark and only fitfully illuminated cavern in which they live – the mind – all we can say about them is that they seem to like people to think before they use them, and to feel before they use them, but to think and feel not about them, but about something different. They are highly sensitive, easily made self-conscious. They do not like to have their purity or their impurity discussed. If you start a Society for Pure English, they will show their resentment by starting another for impure English – hence the unnatural violence of much modern speech; it is a protest against the puritans. They are highly democratic, too; they believe that one word is as good as another; uneducated words are as good as educated words, uncultivated words as good as cultivated words, there are no ranks or titles in their society. Nor do they like being lifted out on the point of a pen and examined separately. They hang together, in sentences, paragraphs, sometimes for whole pages at a time. They hate being useful; they hate making money; they hate being lectured about in public. In short, they hate anything that stamps them with one meaning or confines them to one attitude, for it is their nature to change.

Perhaps that is their most striking peculiarity – their need of change. It is because the truth they try to catch is many-sided, and they convey it by being many-sided, flashing first this way, then that. Thus they mean one thing to one person, another thing to another person; they are unintelligible to one generation, plain as a pikestaff to the next. And it is because of this complexity, this power to mean different things to different people, that they survive. Perhaps then one reason why we have no great poet, novelist or critic writing today is that we refuse to allow words their liberty. We pin them down to one meaning, their useful meaning, the meaning which makes us catch the train, the meaning which makes us pass the examination…

This is the only known surviving recording of Virginia Woolf’s voice. It is part of a BBC radio broadcast from April 29th, 1937. The talk was called “Craftsmanship” and was part of a series entitled “Words Fail Me”. The text was published as an essay in “The Death of the Moth and Other Essays” (1942).

La voz de Virginia Woolf

Esta es la única grabación que aún perdura de la voz de Virginia Woolf. Es parte de una emisión de radio de la BBC del 29 de abril de 1937. La charla se llamó “Artesanía” y fue parte de una serie titulada “Las palabras me fallan”.

suburbia

Is the suffering of others also our own? In thinking that it might in fact be, societies expand the circle of the we.

The environment suddenly shifts in an unforeseen and unwelcome manner.

 

Move to strangeness

 

Human beings need security, order, love, and connection

 

Memories about the past guide this thinking about the future

 

Reactions to a volcano-like event that shook the foundations of the social world.

 

Holding an attitude of benign neglect or cynical indifference

 

A blow to the psyche that breaks through one’s defenses so suddenly and with such brutal force that one can not react to it effectively

 

An important part of the self has disappeared… “We” no longer exist as a connected pair or a linked cells in a larger communal body 

 

Truth goes underground

 

One cannot simply leave behind

 

Buried in the unconscious, the event is experienced irrationally, in the nightmares

 

Denials that insist on looking to the future and forgetting the past

 

Fragmented and polarized social order

 

Bridging the gap between event and representation

 

A spiral of signification

Source:  ALEXANDER_Cultural-Trauma

Arpeggio

“La felicidad no se compra, se construye” // “Happiness can’t be bought, It is built”

DSC02418-2

Nightcrawler (2014)

 

No cesaremos en la exploración
Y el fin de todas nuestras búsquedas
Será llegar adonde comenzamos,
Conocer el lugar por vez primera.
A través de la puerta desconocida y olvidada
Cuando lo último por descubrir en la tierra
Sea lo que fue nuestro comienzo;
En la fuente del río más largo
La voz de la oculta cascada
Y los niños en el manzano
La voz no conocida porque no fue buscada,
Pero escuchada, o semiescuchada, en la quietud
entre dos olas del mar.
De prisa, aquí, ahora, siempre—
Una condición de sencillez absoluta
(Cuesta nada menos que todo).
Y todo irá bien
Y toda clase de cosas saldrá bien
Cuando las lenguas de la llama se enlacen
En el nudo de fuego coronado
Y la lumbre y la rosa sean una.

Thomas Stearns Eliot, Cuatro cuartetos, Little Gidding.

 

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
Through the unknown, unremembered gate
When the last of earth left to discover
Is that which was the beginning;
At the source of the longest river
The voice of the hidden waterfall
And the children in the apple-tree
Not known, because not looked for
But heard, half-heard, in the stillness
Between two waves of the sea.
Quick now, here, now, always—
A condition of complete simplicity
(Costing not less than everything)
And all shall be well and
All manner of thing shall be well
When the tongues of flame are in-folded
Into the crowned knot of fire
And the fire and the rose are one.
T. S. Eliot’s Little Gidding (1942).